A giant leap into wireless

In Slovenia, a small team of developers have created a software tool that enables ‘digital paper.’ Some of the potential customers queuing up to trial the technology include; BMW, Ikea, Marriott Hotels, Greenpeace, DreamWorks Studios, and others. The digital paper technology enables digital signs, for instance for meeting rooms. But this alone isn’t compelling; it’s the fact that the battery powered digital signs don’t require cables and they can be managed via wireless signals.

It may be one small step for the technology industry but it’s a giant leap for customers. And it signals the launch of ever more sophisticated tools that not only makes life easier but also marks the end of spaghetti like piles of cables buried beneath desks, cluttering up living rooms or being hauled out in airport lounges.

For instance, one of our recently released wireless portable storage devices, the MiniStation Air 2, marks a sea change in consumer storage devices. The device is a battery powered wireless hard drive that allows users to expand storage and back up capacities without grappling with wires and cables or hooking it up to the Internet. It uses integrated Wi-Fi, so data can be streamed from up to eight devices including smartphones, tablets, laptops and desktop computers.

It also makes use of DLNA a method for multimedia devices to communicate with each other on a local network. Up to 1TB of portable storage is available so any DLNA-ready device can access whatever is stored, whether it is movies, music, or photos. Further, should you have access to an Internet connection its possible to simultaneously stream music or films while surfing the web.

These types of devices, independent of cables and bandwidth requirements, are the future not only in the consumer world and the corporate sphere, but in other industries too. The rush to test the digital paper device by BMW and others testifies to this.

At a wider level an independent, stand-alone device such as the MiniStation Air 2 with up to 1TB of storage, signals how technology is evolving and breaking into the consumer market. 1TB is a whopping amount of storage and being able to hook up to this without cables and an Internet connection is a ground breaking development that many people are going to find useful. Whether its business travellers or a person going on holiday, the MiniStation Air 2 provides the means to access large amounts of data without incurring huge costs.

This alone is a compelling feature – for instance, we’ve all heard of mobile users abroad being hit with outrageous charges after downloading content. With the Buffalo device users can now plan ahead and take content with them – for free. For most people, mobile computing wasn’t a part of their past, but it will dominate their future and the MiniStation Air 2 illustrates how we are making significant strides on that journey.

Effectively handling your customer data

English: Inside a customer Data Suite in Union...

English: Inside a customer Data Suite in Union Station (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Data security is an issue that both SMBs and enterprises have to address, so storing data on a NAS device that offers multiple levels of security to protect content and privacy is essential. However, that’s not the end of the issue…

Being prepared for suffering a data loss or breach can help lead to a faster, more effective response to your customers. You should be aware of the level of customer data your company is handling and storing, and why. Data breaches can expose how little an organisation really knows about its data. Take steps to protect your customers and your own business by assessing what data you have, who has access to it, and why.

You can control access by ensuring individuals are assigned username and password credentials, and the administrator is able to control folder and file-level access. When enabling individuals to access data through the web, HTTPS-access is available for individuals who need a secure, encrypted connection between their client device and the NAS device.

Access to customer data should be limited to employees who need it for justifiable business reasons. When storing sensitive customer information on external drives, mobile devices or any other hardware that can be easily lost or stolen, first consider whether it’s really necessary.